Publications

Arizio Sweeting has taught and trained in Brazil, Macau, New Zealand and now Australia, where he works for the Institute of Continuing & TESOL Education at the University of Queensland (ICTE-UQ). Here he describes an activity that focuses on the use of students’ voices for delivering messages to others.

Following his first post on giving the learners a ‘pragmatic shock’, Arizio Sweeting returns with more voice-based activities to get your students speaking in English.

In this post, Arizio Sweeting, a Cambridge ESOL Oral Examiner, shares a simple learner training approach to listening and pronunciation development using a shadowing technique.

  • Listening and self-access: a perfect partnership

Abstract: In this article, Arizio Sweeting describes a self-access listening project and  presents practical ideas for exploiting self-access listening to further promote skills and language  development.

Sweeting, Arizio. Listening and self-access: a perfect partnership.  IH Journal; issue 32 p.  4-7; spring 2012.

  • A fresh perspective on verb form instruction: using a ‘perspective list’ approach to help learners understand and use verb forms in English

Abstract: In this  article, Arizio Sweeting describes an innovative approach for helping learners to  understand and use English verb forms with some degree of confidence and accuracy, and then mentions, in brief, the advantages and disadvantages of such approach and, with the help of examples, discuss its implications for the language classroom.

Sweeting, Arizio. A fresh prespective on verb forms instruction: using a ‘perspective list’ approach to help learners understand and use verb forms in Enlgish.  IH Journal; issue 30 p. 10 – 14; spring 2011.

  • Songs : a useful medium for language and skills practice.

Abstract: The usefulness of songs for English language instruction is unquestionable, especially as songs are a good medium for helping learners activate their musical intelligence to improve learning. However, music-based intelligence is often overlooked in language teaching and should be included in language activities more regularly. In this article, a few ideas for using popular English songs in the English language classroom are presented as a way of demonstrating that songs can not only provide learners with a very enjoyable musical experience, but also function as an instrument for language and skills practice.

Sweeting, Arizio. Songs : a useful medium for language and skills practice. EA Journal; v.27 n.1 p.65-73; 2011.

  • Activities for using films in English language teaching

Abstract: In this article, Arizio Sweeting takes a practical approach to the topic by sharing with you a few classroom activities from Language Through Film, a teacher’s resource book I published in 2009 for using short scenes from films such as American Beauty (1999), Muriel’s Wedding (1994) and Ed Wood (1994), to help learners, especially those immersed in English-speaking communities, to develop better
pragmatic awareness so they more easily access and participate in the discourse of such communities.

Sweeting, Arizio. Activities for using films in English language teaching. IH Journal; issue 29  p. 9-11;  autumn 2010.

  • Practical classroom activities for changing learners’ attitudes towards narrative writing.

Abstract: Of all the four skills, writing must surely be the most complex and cognitively-demanding activity undertaken by English language learners worldwide. Consequently, for some learners, writing may seem a hard and meaningless activity, particularly because, unlike speaking, it provokes a multitude of attitudes in learners, which often have a negative effect on their ability to proficiently produce written texts in English. In methodologies, such as the Communicative Approach (CA), where the classroom focus is on student-centredness rather than teacher- centredness, the act of writing represents a rather stressful idea- generating process. As a result, in the communicative English language classroom, the need for activities that generate positive reactions in the learners about writing is crucial to ensure that learners’ ideas flow more easily onto paper. This article describes two activities that are examples of how the writing teacher can successfully reshape learners’ attitudes towards writing by reducing their anxiety in order to maximise confidence in narrative writing in English. These activities are: using sound effects to create a narrative; and being a tabloid journalist for a day. Teachers can assist learners to modify negative attitudes towards producing written texts in English by developing fun and motivating classroom activities.

Sweeting, Arizio. Practical classroom activities for changing learners’ attitudes towards narrative writing. EA Journal; v.26 n.1 p.91-94; 2010.

  • Film-based activities to overcome the ‘gap-fill syndrome’.

Abstract: One of the greatest advantages of using films for English language instruction is that films encourage learners to engage with what is happening on the screen on both an intellectual and creative level. Films are ‘realistic slices of life’ and, therefore, an excellent vehicle for focusing learners on situational language, where an understanding of both verbal and non-verbal communication tends to be a prerequisite for the negotiation of meaning. Currently, it seems that the use of films in English language teaching in many classrooms around the world is suffering from a dominant ‘gap-fill syndrome’, a common tendency of teachers to engage their learners in ‘relentless’ viewing and listening gap-fill activities. Gap-fill activities often require excessive written support, and this quite often leads learners to pay more attention to the completion of the task at hand rather than the observation of nuances of language which are embodied in or can be generated from the film. This article questions the overuse of this type of activity in film-related instruction, as it seems to favour word recognition over the attention to meaning of the contextual language in the film.

Sweeting, Arizio. Film-based activities to overcome the ‘gap-fill syndrome’.  EA Journal; v.25 n.2 p.51-57; 2009.

In this speaking activity, Arizio Sweeting shares an activity to get students telling personal stories e prompted by pictures. Submitted by TE Editor on 22 July, 2009 – 13:16

CLESOL 2004: Language, Community, Diversity: Hearing Every Voice. Refereed Conference Proceedings, Workshops and Keynote Addresses. 9th International Confernce on Community Languages and English for Speakers of Other Languages. Published 2005.

Editors: Jae Major and Jocelyn Howard, Christchurch College of Education. ISBN: 0-908858-09-4

Board games like Snakes and ladders have been around the EFL block for a while because they add the element of fun to the English classroom and are certainly a very useful way to develop more effective classroom dynamics. In this post, Arizio Sweeting shows how he has adapted the Snakes and ladders game to give the learners in my group an opportunity to discuss cultural differences between countries. Submitted by TE Editor on 9 January, 2003 – 12:00

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